In This Issue

  • Monthly Rough Rice Vessel Loadings in Port of Lake Charles, Louisiana Contribute to Export Efforts
  • Texas Rice Update
  • Rumors on Short List for Clinton Ag Secretary Emerges


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Monthly Rough Rice Vessel Loadings in Port of Lake Charles, Louisiana Contribute to Export Efforts

Identity Preserved, Variety Specific Shipments Advantageous to Buyers

[vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477705261905{border-top-width: 3px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 5px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #81d742 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #81d742 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #81d742 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #81d742 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]It has been a temperate week in the rice industry following on the heels of last week’s roller-coaster ride.  To say that the market was muted might possibly be an understatement but a more accurate comparison might be that everything is back to normal.  The export market picked up slightly from the last report with an approximate 10,000 MT increase.  These levels are consistent with the standard export pace and will help to keep things moving through the system industry-wide.  Continued sales will be key in the coming weeks in order to manage the 2016 crop.  Vessel loadings were off as compared to last week, but given the total volume, is still a respectable number.  USDA decreased its world market price estimate this week for both medium and short grain.  The bad news of course is that the price was reduced.  The more positive side is that the down trend seems to be tapering off implying that some stabilization may be forthcoming in the future.  Much of the shift may be attributable to Asian pricing which was sideways to downward over the past week.  As always currencies play a factor in these prices, but some fundamental forces are at work in the region as well.  Domestically, cash prices have not seen significant moves to the up or downside since the last report.  A large component of this is the volatility in the futures market coupled with inherent market saturation.  Additionally, the market has reached the point beyond which sellers are not interested.  Until the glut is eased through the market, long term pricing is not likely to look very different from current levels.  The futures market saw significant action over the week with the weekly trading erasing the gains of the previous week’s trading.  Open contracts shed between 3%-4% of value during this time.  The nearby November contract was hit particularly hard as it prepares to leave the active board for the January ’17 contract.  In farm country, harvest is beginning to wrap up in most areas.  Texas and Louisiana are well into second crop harvest with some growers having completed it entirely.  Arkansas, Mississippi and Missouri report first crop harvest virtually complete.  Milling yields across all states are poorer than was initially hoped for although most of the crop seems to be able to make a US Grade #2.  Chalk issues have abounded, and coupled with less than spectacular field yields has made it very difficult for growers to yield out from under the depressed market.  Overall conditions have growers questioning planting intentions for the 2017 crop.  Regardless of the final outcome, the face of agriculture will look very different in the year to come.

 

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Texas Rice Update

By: Dr. M.O. (Mo) Way, Professor of Entomology, Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center

[vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477706097952{border-top-width: 3px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 5px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #81d742 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #81d742 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #81d742 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #81d742 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]The end of October is upon us and we are wrapping up the 2016 rice year. It’s been very dry and warm the entire month of October which is ideal for ratoon crop harvest. Speaking of the ratoon crop, we still have not found any rice planthoppers on the ratoon crop (or main crop) this year in Texas. As you recall, last year Texas ratoon rice grown on the west side of the Texas Rice Belt suffered considerable damage from this pest which is native to Latin America and the Caribbean. I remain concerned about the possible appearance of this pest in the future. Drs. Yu Peng, Ismael Badillo-Vargas and I received a grant from Texas A&M AgriLife Research to study this insect which has the ability to transmit a virus causing a disease called “hoja blanca”. I plan to travel to Central America to learn more about the rice planthopper in its native habitat. The above grant will pay for this travel. I have contacted colleagues in Nicaragua where the rice planthopper has been particularly bad. Also, recently the Beaumont Center hosted undergraduate students and faculty from the Universidad Nacional de Agricultura in Olancho, Honduras. They were visiting Lamar University and wanted to come see our Center. Abby McManus, Ana Cristina Pereda from Lamar University and Dr. Ted Wilson set up the visit. Scientists at the Beaumont Center gave PowerPoint presentations to the group. We talked about our research and rice production in Texas. During this visit I was able to meet Mauricio Moreno who is on the faculty of the above university in Honduras. He invited me to visit Honduras and possibly set up cooperative experiments on the rice planthopper. Visiting and exchanging information and ideas with foreign colleagues can often lead to unexpected benefits for all involved.

Beaumont Center hosts Honduran and Lamar University guests October 21, 2016

Beaumont Center hosts Honduran and Lamar University guests October 21, 2016

In one of my earlier articles I described an undergraduate Chinese intern program organized by Dr. Shane Zhou. Our 6 interns are doing a great job helping our projects conduct research and they are benefiting our programs immensely. As a reward, we took the interns to the Shangri La Botanical Gardens in Orange, Texas on October 11. Thanks to Ellen Rondomanski for hosting our visit and waiving the cost of admission. We also thank the pontoon boat crew—Susan, Glenn and Tom—for taking us up the bayou to see osprey, different species of egrets, ibises, a 1500 year old cypress tree, giant salvinia and a “logagator”! Incidentally, Ellen and her predecessor, Noelle Jordan, have been operating our Mexican rice borer pheromone trap for many years. We appreciate their help.

Chinese interns and others on pontoon boat at Shangri La Botanical Gardens, Orange, TX October 11, 2016

Chinese interns and others on pontoon boat at Shangri La Botanical Gardens, Orange, TX October 11, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1477706638536{border-radius: 3px !important;}”][vc_column]

Rumors on Short List for Clinton Ag Secretary Emerges

[vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477706168254{border-top-width: 3px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 5px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #81d742 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #81d742 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #81d742 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #81d742 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]Earlier this week, a short list emerged of five potential picks for a Hillary Clinton administration Secretary of Agriculture. The five names include: former Arkansas Senator Blanche Lincoln, former Deputy USDA Secretary Kathleen Merrigan, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, California Secretary of Agriculture Karen Ross, and former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear. Just under two weeks until election day, the list remains fluid. Another factor which will influence the final decision is the Clinton pledge to make at least half of her cabinet women.

Current rumors indicate that Karen Ross has emerged as the likely frontrunner. In her current role, she heads the agriculture department of California, the largest farming state in the country. If selected by Clinton, she would be the second female from California to serve as Secretary of Agriculture. Ann Veneman, who served under President George W. Bush, was the first woman to serve as Secretary of Agriculture. Before being tapped by California Gov. Jerry Brown in 2011 to serve as Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, Ross served as chief of staff for U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, and before that, headed the California Association of Winegrape Growers for over a decade.

Former Senator Blanche Lincoln is also considered to be a top contender for the post. She made history for being the first female chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee before losing her seat in 2010 to Sen. John Boozman. Current USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack has said that he hopes to see a Governor fill his shoes, however only two members on the rumor list meet that qualification—Beshears and Hickenlooper. For his part, Gov. Hickenlooper is also a rumored to be a top contender to lead the Interior department under a Clinton administration.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477706582012{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 5px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #81d742 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #81d742 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #81d742 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #81d742 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]The new ProMexa rice mill, located just outside the Port of Veracruz in Mexico nears completion and awaits its first shipment of U.S. rough rice, currently being loaded in the Port of Lake Charles, Louisiana. The new facility plans to import 15,000 MT of U.S. rough rice monthly. Congrats to the managers of the mill; pictured above (left to right) Ivan Garcia, Dwight Roberts of USRPA and Jorge Senties.The new ProMexa rice mill, located just outside the Port of Veracruz in Mexico nears completion and awaits its first shipment of U.S. rough rice, currently being loaded in the Port of Lake Charles, Louisiana. The new facility plans to import 15,000 MT of U.S. rough rice monthly. Congrats to the managers of the mill; pictured above (left to right) Ivan Garcia, Dwight Roberts of USRPA and Jorge Senties.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1477706840611{border-radius: 3px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477706809745{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 5px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 5px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #81d742 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #81d742 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #81d742 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #81d742 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]fecarrox_board

Above, the Central American Rice Federation (FECARROZ) held their regular Board Meeting in Guatemala City, Guatemala today.

Pictured below, Jay Davis, of Costal Rice Futures, a member of USRPA, gives a U.S. rice crop update presentation to the FECARROZ Board of Directors today in Guatemala City.

fecarrox_jay[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1477706909279{border-radius: 3px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477706896223{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 10px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #45962e !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #45962e !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #45962e !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #45962e !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]2016-10-28_gyielding

 

USRPA’s Greg Yielding met with Miguel Alvin Mederos, First Secretary at the Cuban Embassy in Washington, DC this week to discuss rice trade issues and future projects planned with the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, Alimport and other Cuban agencies.  The USRPA played a key role in the initial tweaking of the embargo back in 2000 with their work on the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act that first opened the door for trade after 38 years.  The USRPA continues to push for normal trade through its involvement with the US Ag Coalition for Cuba, the Texas Cuba Trade Alliance, Engage Cuba and other initiatives.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]The latest Texas Rice Crop Survey reports (updated through Friday, October 28, 2016) are available through the Beaumont Center web site at http://beaumont.tamu.edu/CropSurvey/

The crop survey provides detailed data on rice acreage across the Texas rice belt, including information on varieties and crop development.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1477697799885{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 10px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #565656 !important;border-left-style: double !important;border-right-color: #565656 !important;border-right-style: double !important;border-top-color: #565656 !important;border-top-style: double !important;border-bottom-color: #565656 !important;border-bottom-style: double !important;border-radius: 3px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477697847225{border-radius: 3px !important;}”]

Headline From The Washington Post
October 26, 2017

In a first in 25 years, U.S. abstains in U.N. vote condemning its Cuba policy
By Karen DeYoung

For the first time in a quarter-century, the United States abstained Wednesday in the annual United Nations vote condemning the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba.

Read Article Here[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”15px”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1477697377878{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #1629a3 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #1629a3 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #1629a3 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #1629a3 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;border-radius: 3px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”1166″ alignment=”center”]

Food and Agriculture Regulatory and Policy Roundup

Congress News / USDA Reports & News / White House News and More...

[/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”1171″ alignment=”center” style=”vc_box_shadow_3d” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” link=”http://www.ricemtconvention.com”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”1172″ alignment=”center” style=”vc_box_shadow_3d” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” link=”http://nctd.net/”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477707098623{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 10px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #81d742 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #81d742 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #81d742 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #81d742 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]USDA Reports Next Week

Crop Progress (NASS)                                        Monday, October 31, 4:00 pm

Weekly Export Sales (FAS)                                 Thursday, November 3, 8:30 am

All USDA reports are available by visiting

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/?navid=AGENCY_REPORTS=RT.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1477701221486{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 10px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;}”][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1477707077033{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;padding-top: 10px !important;padding-right: 10px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;padding-left: 10px !important;border-left-color: #81d742 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #81d742 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #81d742 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #81d742 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”]Additional Resources

December 7-9, 2017        FECARROZ Board Meeting, Houston, TX

January 18, 2017            Texas Rice Council Annual Mtg & Western Rice Belt Conf., El Campo

Jan. 30-Feb. 1, 2017        20th Annual NCS Cotton & Rice Conference, Baton Rouge, LA

For economic analysis on agricultural efficiency, efficacy, and equity issues: www.ers.usda.gov

Texas Rice from A&M AgriLife Research Ctr. at Beaumont: http://beaumont.tamu.edu/eLibrary/eLibrary_default.htm

AgFax – Editor: Owen Taylor: www.agfax.com[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]logo-01

2825 Wilcrest Dr., Ste. 218
Houston, TX 77042
Phone: (713) 974-7423
Fax: 713-974-7696
https://usriceproducers.com/
http://www.riceromp.com

www.facebook.com/usrpa[/vc_column_text][vc_separator color=”green” border_width=”3″][vc_column_text]USRPA does not discriminate in its programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, or marital/family status. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of information (such as Braille, large print, sign language interpreter) should contact USRPA at 713-974-7423.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Categories: Rice Advocate

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